IndieView with Feyisayo Anjorin, author of Kasali’s Africa

Kasali’s daughter who has been a secret rebel in her father’s Akure enclave visits her aunt in Monrovia, gets drunk on her freedom, and is soon caught in the web of violence that engulfs Liberia’s Glay presidency. Where do you live now? My grandfather was polygamous, but he is in no way like Kasali. Where did you get the idea from? Sometimes I write with an outline, and sometimes I don’t. Do you listen to music while you write? There is a plan. We all know how important it is for writers to read. Kasali was real to me, it was as if I knew him. I can’t even design a flyer. If there is an outline it is just the main plot points, the back story, and the peculiarities of the characters that I note. Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) My writing is both experimental and unconventional. The characters are entirely fictitious, but I also borrowed a few elements from real world people. If yes, what gets the fingers tapping? How long did it take you to write it? I want everyone who loves a good story to read Kasali’s Africa. There is a process. My writing style changed significantly after reading T C Boyle. Sometimes I write these few pages that seem like nonsense and leave it for a few months. I got the idea from observing life in my hometown, which is full of contradictions; and also the frequent social media clashes of feminists and misogynists, hypocrites and archaic traditionalists. I wanted to create a character and a story that could bring these diverse ideas and opinions to a sort of boxing ring. When did you start writing the book? Later I go back to it and then it doesn’t seem like nonsense again. Then a few months later I wrote the chapter ‘Kasali’s Love’ which was first published on the Website ‘Fiction On The Web’. Sometimes stories come fully formed, so I just sit down and write the whole thing. I love John Grisham, Chinua Achebe, and T C Boyle, I love Alice Munro and then C S Lewis is a big influence on me, I’ve read all his works of non-fiction in print. If you have a great story, get it out there by all means. About Publishing
Did you submit your work to Agents? I discovered recently that once I get all the names of the characters in the story right, the rest flows easily. I edit when I’m convinced I have a whole story. End of Interview:
For more from   Feyisayo follow him on Twitter. Are your characters entirely fictitious or have you borrowed from real world people you know? A movie script for a client. Feyisayo Anjorin – 22 January 2019
The Back Flap
Kasali Adebayor, a prominent farmer in the city of Akure, a husband of five wives, fancies himself as an activist for good governance while wielding the big stick of patriarchy over his family members. Make sure it is really a great story and tell it excellently. About Writing
Do you have a writing process? I knew soldiers who fought in the Liberian civil war and I knew guys from Liberia and Sierra Leone in my secondary school years. I love his sense of humor. Approximately, about a year. Do you have a target reader? Go figure. I don’t remember struggling with any part. Any advice that you would like to give to other newbies considering becoming Indie authors? I live in Akure. Do you outline? I grew up in Akure. If so can you please describe it? I start to develop it. What came easily? Some publishing houses were not confortable with the peculiarity, so had to accept the one that placed great value on the art. Are there any particular authors that have influenced how you write and, if so, how have they influenced you? Were there any parts of the book where you struggled? Get your copy of   Kasali’s Africa from Amazon US or Amazon UK. I finish the story, then I go back to it later for a fresh look. It was professionally done. It was a gradual process. Was it a particular event or a gradual process? It is about a prominent farmer, Kasali; it is about Africa and the clash of ideas on the global stage and how it plays out on the continent; it is about the troubled marriage of cultures and philosophies in a fast-changing society and the cold war going on in the life and home of the protagonist, Kasali. What are you working on now? I listen to the music that I feel is the soundtrack of the character’s life or experiences, not necessarily the music that I like. Do you have a marketing plan for the book or are you just winging it? About the book
What is the book about? I’m as curious as you are. What would you like readers to know about you? I’ve always been fascinated by how he was able to handle his many wives. Nothing rigid. If so, do you do so extensively or just chapter headings and a couple of sentences? I am a 21st century explorer. Sometimes I just sit down and force myself to write. About You
Where did you grow up? Two particular chapters come to mind. Do you edit as you go or wait until you’ve finished? My Dad and one of my uncles were top government officials and I am quite close to some journalists. I imagined the man Kasali and how he would react if someone shows up in his farm and starts talking about child labour, that was why I wrote the chapter ‘A Family Affair’. Did you get your book cover professionally done or did you do it yourself? I started writing the book in 2013 even though I did not know it would become a novel. In the fast changing African political landscape Kasali’s family comes under the spotlight; an exposure which – initially appealing and addictive – threatens everything he holds dear and secret. No
What made you decide to go Indie, whether self-publishing or with an indie publisher? I got the idea from observing life in my hometown, which is full of contradictions; and also the frequent social media clashes of feminists and misogynists, hypocrites and archaic traditionalists. Kasali Adebayor, weak against the subtle feminism-inspired request of his of beloved wife Mojisola, ends in a dead end that brings out the worst in him, and begins the end of Kasali’s Africa. I wanted to create a character and a story that could bring these diverse ideas and opinions to a sort of boxing ring. Music helps me to get the mindset of the character.