IndieView with Alison Baird, author of The House of the Wolf

Where did you get the idea from? We all know how important it is for writers to read. My usual procedure is to write a rough outline first and then ignore it completely once the writing starts to flow! I just picture myself as a young reader, think of what I enjoyed most in books at that age, and hope there are similar readers out there today. I wanted to write a book about my birth province of Quebec, Canada. I have been represented by literary agents in the past, and have sold books through them. I used to edit as I went, but now I know better. Do you outline? A sequel to The House of the Wolf. Did you get your book cover professionally done or did you do it yourself? Since I write primarily in the fantasy genre, I looked for an aspect of Quebec folklore which I could incorporate into a story with supernatural elements, and ended up settling on the Loup Garou, or werewolf. Hopefully this one won’t take so long to write! My website is at www.alisonbaird.net and I am also on Twitter (@bairdwriter) and Facebook (Alison Baird Author). I dabble a bit in art – sketching and watercolour – but I’m nowhere near good enough to make my own covers! If so, do you do so extensively or just chapter headings and a couple of sentences? There is a new term in the industry these days, “hybrid author”, which refers to writers who publish traditionally but also produce some independent works on the side. Music that sounds big and epic and dramatic really helps when you’re writing, especially with works of fantasy. That’s how I’ve always felt about other authors. I love to learn new things, and hope that my readers will too. When did you start writing the book? Do you listen to music while you write? About You
Where did you grow up? Are your characters entirely fictitious or have you borrowed from real world people you know? It comes in fits and starts – brief bursts of inspiration followed by long tedious editing sessions. For readers I think it has turned into something rather like the indie music scene, an alternative to whatever the mainstream is selling. I received an Ontario Arts Council grant to write this book some years ago. I was born in Quebec, and spent my early years there. My characters are fictitious but they seem incredibly real to me – almost like real people I have met. How long did it take you to write it? I turn to professionals for that. If so can you please describe it? What are you working on now? =
I would advise going the traditional route first, but to keep indie publishing in mind as an option once you’re established. Any advice that you would like to give to other newbies considering becoming Indie authors? I like to think that everything about me that’s important is in my writing – that reading my books is a way to get to know me. End of Interview:
Get your copy of   The House of the Wolf from Amazon US or Amazon UK. For readers I think it has turned into something rather like the indie music scene, an alternative to whatever the mainstream is selling. It took me years, off and on, as I was also working on other projects. Did you hire a professional editor? When the writing really flows it’s best to just keep going. Was it a particular event or a gradual process? All of them wrote a rich, descriptive prose that impressed me very much as a young reader. I have published ten books with traditional publishing houses such as Penguin and the former Warner Aspect imprint. I now live in the province of Ontario. Were there any parts of the book where you struggled? Do you have a marketing plan for the book or are you just winging it? This is a novel about a young girl who travels to Quebec in order to learn more about her late father, and finds herself getting mixed up with his very strange family – who may be a pack of werewolves. Where do you live now? About the book
What is the book about? The French dialogue! Are there any particular authors that have influenced how you write and, if so, how have they influenced you?  
I kept reading about advances in technology that have made independent publishing a much more viable option than in previous eras. I know a terrific freelance editor whom I rely on a great deal. I suppose I now fit that “hybrid” description. Do you have a target reader? What came easily? That aroused my curiosity, and I decided to try it for myself. The research that precedes the actual writing is always fascinating to me. Movie scores. If yes, what gets the fingers tapping? Alison Baird – 14 March 2018
The Back Flap
A young girl fears that she may be turning into a werewolf. There is a particularly rich body of lore associated with werewolves in French Canada, an oral tradition that the settlers brought along with them when they came here. You can visualize scenes and action sequences in your head as you listen. You can always fix things later. What would you like readers to know about you? Do you edit as you go or wait until you’ve finished? I kept reading about advances in technology that have made independent publishing a much more viable option than in previous eras. What made you decide to go Indie, whether self-publishing or with an indie publisher? We form a good team. That aroused my curiosity, and I decided to try it for myself. About Writing
Do you have a writing process? About Publishing
Did you submit your work to Agents? I hope they will seem real to readers as well. Expressing my love for this province, its culture and history and folklore. Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) I count among my influences J R R Tolkien and C S Lewis, as well as Arthurian novelists T H White and Mary Stewart. My French is a bit rusty. At the moment I’m winging it, taking advice from others and learning as I go.